Appreciating a Preference for Introversion

April 21, 2013 by  

I have had the pleasure of getting to know many people whose preference for introversion is obvious in their interpersonal relationships – including their relationships with me, an avowed extrovert. In her recent excellent bestseller Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking, I was reminded of the many famous and talented introverts who have given the world great things. The contributions of Albert Einstein, Warren Buffet, Barbara Streisand, Bill Gates are unprecedented and undeniable. I realize that with age and experience I am getting better at being a good listener when I am with people whose preference is for Introversion. Even though I still find the silence disconcerting, I am trying to better understand and appreciate it, and, through my own silence, enable both my own reflections about the nature of our conversation, as well as the ability of my introverted colleague to choose where to take the next part of our discussion. It’s hard work though very worthwhile for both of us.

Leading in Complex Systems

November 10, 2009 by  

Health care leaders have begun to adapt to the complexities, ambiguities and paradoxes that are now the norm in healthcare.

It is more and more apparent that the emerging field of complexity science offers important strategies for leading in chaotic, complex healthcare environments. A 2001 survey by Burns found that healthcare leaders intuitively support principles of complexity science and understand the value of complex adaptive systems as a model for leading and managing in healthcare environments.

Leadership that uses complexity principles offers opportunities to focus less on prediction and control and more on fostering relationships and creating conditions in which complex adaptive systems can evolve and produce creative outcomes.
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