Developing a Culture of Innovation

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    I’ve been thinking a lot about innovation – the concept has crossed my desk from several different directions recently. I always take notice when I see something several times in short succession from variable sources. It usually means something is moving away from the edges and hitting the mainstream. I like to think of the application to healthcare-which is in need of significant innovation. A few interesting definitions of innovation (which can be a vague over-used term) are emerging from different sources.

    Innovators are people who apply new and original ideas and methods to solve existing and potential issues and problems. Using creative thinking and idea development, innovators are willing and prepared to embark on an initiative that will advance their profession, organization, business, and/or goal. Turning their ideas into action, they play a key role in driving something forward (adapted from Donner and Wheeler).

    An HBR article on Twitter today by Soren Kaplan provided some further insights. Innovation he says can be categorized into 3 different types: incremental (small tweaks that advance the core business), evolutionary (changes that evolve with other changes), and disruptive (defined as an innovation that creates a new market and value network, eventually disrupting an existing market and value network, and often displacing established leading market firms, products, and relationships). A lot has been written in recent years about disruption and disruptive innovations (see Christensen HBS).

    Most organizations today want more innovation. They want employees to be focused on how things could be done more efficiently, smoothly and with more positive outcomes. The highly competitive environment demands this kind of thinking and action. Organizations need people who will find a problem, create an innovative solution, evaluate its functionality and scale it up. Often what stands in the way of more innovation is organizational culture, known to be one of the areas that are hardest to change. Strategies proposed by Kaplan are: embedding innovation in structures and processes across the organization, getting people in all roles and levels involved, training and development in innovative and design thinking, ensuring that good ideas get traction and are widely publicized, and supporting a few key leaders to effectively champion the ideas and keep up the momentum. Many people believe there are no bad ideas; what counts are the early ideas.

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